Ray Dalio: The World Has Gone Mad and the System Is Broken
Unicredit e le altre, i titoli da monitorare oggi a Piazza Affari. Impostazione grafica rialzista per il Ftse Mib
Conto alla rovescia ormai iniziato per la fine del 2019 e Piazza Affari nelle ultime sedute sembra aver ritrovato la via dei rialzi, con l’ultima importante sponda arrivata venerdì dai …
Banca IMI lancia sul mercato 22 nuovi Cash Collect Protetto su azioni italiane ed europee
Si amplia ulteriormente la gamma degli strumenti di investimento emessi da Banca IMI, grazie a 22 nuovi Cash Collect Protetto che, a partire da oggi 9 dicembre, sono quotati sul …
Mes, Gualtieri attacca ‘campagna terroristica’ Salvini-Borghi: scoppia caso Nutella. Il tweet di Cottarelli su spread
Il ministro: "Alla fine abbiamo saldato il conto del Papeete, una manovra che è riuscita nel miracolo. Non era facile fare una manovra con quella eredità".
Tutti gli articoli
Tutti gli articoli Tutte le notizie

  1. #1
    L'avatar di Sency
    Data Registrazione
    Aug 2004
    Messaggi
    2,453
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quoted
    958 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949688

    Ray Dalio: The World Has Gone Mad and the System Is Broken

    I say these things because:

    Money is free for those who are creditworthy because the investors who are giving it to them are willing to get back less than they give. More specifically investors lending to those who are creditworthy will accept very low or negative interest rates and won’t require having their principal paid back for the foreseeable future. They are doing this because they have an enormous amount of money to invest that has been, and continues to be, pushed on them by central banks that are buying financial assets in their futile attempts to push economic activity and inflation up. The reason that this money that is being pushed on investors isn’t pushing growth and inflation much higher is that the investors who are getting it want to invest it rather than spend it. This dynamic is creating a “pushing on a string” dynamic that has happened many times before in history (though not in our lifetimes) and was thoroughly explained in my book Principles for Navigating Big Debt Crises. As a result of this dynamic, the prices of financial assets have gone way up and the future expected returns have gone way down while economic growth and inflation remain sluggish. Those big price rises and the resulting low expected returns are not just true for bonds; they are equally true for equities, private equity, and venture capital, though these assets’ low expected returns are not as apparent as they are for bond investments because these equity-like investments don’t have stated returns the way bonds do. As a result, their expected returns are left to investors’ imaginations. Because investors have so much money to invest and because of past success stories of stocks of revolutionary technology companies doing so well, more companies than at any time since the dot-com bubble don’t have to make profits or even have clear paths to making profits to sell their stock because they can instead sell their dreams to those investors who are flush with money and borrowing power. There is now so much money wanting to buy these dreams that in some cases venture capital investors are pushing money onto startups that don’t want more money because they already have more than enough; but the investors are threatening to harm these companies by providing enormous support to their startup competitors if they don’t take the money. This pushing of money onto investors is understandable because these investment managers, especially venture capital and private equity investment managers, now have large piles of committed and uninvested cash that they need to invest in order to meet their promises to their clients and collect their fees.
    At the same time, large government deficits exist and will almost certainly increase substantially, which will require huge amounts of more debt to be sold by governments—amounts that cannot naturally be absorbed without driving up interest rates at a time when an interest rate rise would be devastating for markets and economies because the world is so leveraged long. Where will the money come from to buy these bonds and fund these deficits? It will almost certainly come from central banks, which will buy the debt that is produced with freshly printed money. This whole dynamic in which sound finance is being thrown out the window will continue and probably accelerate, especially in the reserve currency countries and their currencies—i.e., in the US, Europe, and Japan, and in the dollar, euro, and yen.
    At the same time, pension and healthcare liability payments will increasingly be coming due while many of those who are obligated to pay them don’t have enough money to meet their obligations. Right now many pension funds that have investments that are intended to meet their pension obligations use assumed returns that are agreed to with their regulators. They are typically much higher (around 7%) than the market returns that are built into the pricing and that are likely to be produced. As a result, many of those who have the obligations to deliver the money to pay these pensions are unlikely to have enough money to meet their obligations. Those who are recipients of these benefits and expecting these commitments to be adhered to are typically teachers and other government employees who are also being squeezed by budget cuts. They are unlikely to quietly accept having their benefits cut. While pension obligations at least have some funding, most healthcare obligations are funded on a pay-as-you-go basis, and because of the shifting demographics in which fewer earners are having to support a larger population of baby boomers needing healthcare, there isn’t enough money to fund these obligations either. Since there isn’t enough money to fund these pension and healthcare obligations, there will likely be an ugly battle to determine how much of the gap will be bridged by 1) cutting benefits, 2) raising taxes, and 3) printing money (which would have to be done at the federal level and pass to those at the state level who need it). This will exacerbate the wealth gap battle. While none of these three paths are good, printing money is the easiest path because it is the most hidden way of creating a wealth transfer and it tends to make asset prices rise. After all, debt and other financial obligations that are denominated in the amount of money owed only require the debtors to deliver money; because there are no limitations made on the amounts of money that can be printed or the value of that money, it is the easiest path. The big risk of this path is that it threatens the viability of the three major world reserve currencies as viable storeholds of wealth. At the same time, if policy makers can’t monetize these obligations, then the rich/poor battle over how much expenses should be cut and how much taxes should be raised will be much worse. As a result rich capitalists will increasingly move to places in which the wealth gaps and conflicts are less severe and government officials in those losing these big tax payers will increasingly try to find ways to trap them.
    At the same time as money is essentially free for those who have money and creditworthiness, it is essentially unavailable to those who don’t have money and creditworthiness, which contributes to the rising wealth, opportunity, and political gaps. Also contributing to these gaps are the technological advances that investors and the entrepreneurs that I previously mentioned are excited by in the ways I described, and that also replace workers with machines. Because the “trickle-down” process of having money at the top trickle down to workers and others by improving their earnings and creditworthiness is not working, the system of making capitalism work well for most people is broken.

    This set of circumstances is unsustainable and certainly can no longer be pushed as it has been pushed since 2008. That is why I believe that the world is approaching a big paradigm shift.

  2. #2

    Data Registrazione
    Mar 2018
    Messaggi
    210
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quoted
    111 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    5018100
    Litigato con la barra spaziatrice?

    Scherzi a parte vogliamo parlare della tempesta degli student loans americani che farà sembrare un nulla la questione subprime?

  3. #3

    Data Registrazione
    May 2009
    Messaggi
    12,453
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1018 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949683
    mah...in larga parte del mondo i tassi e l'inflazione sono ancora lontani dallo zero, anche se in discesa. E' facile pesare che la tendenza a tassi bassi e bassa inflazione prosegua. Questo è (sarà) un cambiamento notevole rispetto a quanto visto negli ultimi decenni. Sinora le risposte monetarie alla bassa inflazione e alla crescita economica talvolta insoddisfacente sono state in america ed in europa il taglio dei tassi, poi il qe e poco altro. Sono scelte che probabilmente stanno perdendo efficacia (a parte l'impatto notevole sul mercato azionario ed obbligazionario) e ne perderanno ancora con l'eventuale calo dei tassi verso lo zero anche negli Usa.

    Secondo me in assenza di nuove crisi gravi non è probabile che le scelte monetarie cambino in maniera netta e rapida.

    L'evoluzione che mi pare più probabile nel caso di nuove crisi gravi e tendenza deflattiva è il finanziamento diretto della bce e fed a programmi di investimento/assistenzialismo: stampare e spendere.

    Se più paesi andassero in futuro verso questa strada, in maniera progressiva e cauta, diverrebbe più facilmente percorribile e potrebbe parzialmente sostituire il qe. Sarebbe però necessaria una classe politica più preparata e meno truffaldina, ogni giorno in cui un politico asino si sveglia dice:"ma allora monetizziamo, fottiamo i bondisti con tassi reali negativi e svalutiamo", la possibilità di estendere in maniera sana il potere dell'intervento monetario, si allontana...e forse è meglio così.

    Un'alternativa sarebbe la prosecuzione della gestione della ciclicità tramite tassi anche largamente negativi, ma richiederebbe l'abolizione del contante o una moneta cartacea che si svaluti in maniera programmabile dal banchiere centrale. E' una possibile alternativa a monetizzazione/qe/incremento della spesa pubblica. Per il prossimo secolo?

    mi scusino gli austriaci per gli auspici

    ****

    naturalmente paesi come l'italia avrebbero altre 1000 cose da migliorare e da fare per favorire lo sviluppo economico; questa dovrebbe divenire una frase fissa, dopo ogni discussione su scelte monetarie

  4. #4
    L'avatar di Emi_
    Data Registrazione
    Dec 2008
    Messaggi
    20,071
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Quoted
    4459 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949683
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da piof Visualizza Messaggio
    mi scusino gli austriaci per gli auspici

    il tasso di sconto e' la determinante del saggio di profitto... non so bene se lo speri davvero
    e se si le conseguenze saranno talmente assurde che metteranno fine a questo sistema monetario

    e lo diceva keynes... conseguenze economiche della pace

  5. #5
    L'avatar di FogOnLine
    Data Registrazione
    Feb 2014
    Messaggi
    9,359
    Mentioned
    49 Post(s)
    Quoted
    3487 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949678
    Interessante che un eccesso di liquidità, poco remunerata sui canali 'classici', si sposti (o ci siano incentivi a farla spostare) su investimenti dalle prospettive e dai rendimenti 'futuribili', difficilmente valutabili a priori.

    Questo tipo di investimenti, penso per es. ad ambiti innovativi e tecnologici, statisticamente qualche frutto lo porteranno (sia in termini di rendimento che di 'progresso'), ma una grande massa di liquidità investita in qualcosa "quale che sia" mi sembra molto poco efficiente anche ai fini dell'evoluzione tecnologica.

  6. #6
    L'avatar di Emi_
    Data Registrazione
    Dec 2008
    Messaggi
    20,071
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Quoted
    4459 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949683
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da FogOnLine Visualizza Messaggio
    Interessante che un eccesso di liquidità, poco remunerata sui canali 'classici', si sposti (o ci siano incentivi a farla spostare) su investimenti dalle prospettive e dai rendimenti 'futuribili', difficilmente valutabili a priori.

    Questo tipo di investimenti, penso per es. ad ambiti innovativi e tecnologici, statisticamente qualche frutto lo porteranno (sia in termini di rendimento che di 'progresso'), ma una grande massa di liquidità investita in qualcosa "quale che sia" mi sembra molto poco efficiente anche ai fini dell'evoluzione tecnologica.

    da value e' andato tutto su growth, ma alla fine, alla lunga, il prezzo di ogni cosa sconta il suo flusso futuro di cassa...
    wework e' stata un disastro (per gli arabi ) e un segnale che non basta bruciare cassa per creare valore



    se continuano creeranno solo tante copie di jervolino investment, bio on e cagate varie sulla borsa, ma nessun aumento del gdp... ormai sono schemi a se stanti... e non credo sia quello che vogliamo

  7. #7

    Data Registrazione
    May 2009
    Messaggi
    12,453
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1018 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    42949683
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da Emi_ Visualizza Messaggio
    ... non so bene se lo speri davvero
    e se si le conseguenze saranno talmente assurde che metteranno fine a questo sistema monetario
    i tassi largamente negativi possono esser per ora solo un esercizio logico, non sono possibili, però se fossero possibili consentirebbero una gestione monetaria in un certo senso standard: l'economia va bene, la disoccupazione cala>tassi in rialzo; l'economia rallenta, la disoccupazione sale>taglio dei tassi, senza la preoccupazione di non poter andare sotto zero. La deflazione diverrebbe accettabile, niente più qe, niente più piani di acquisto di obbligazioni societarie, ma la convenzionale politica monetaria. Non credo li vedrò mai in vita mia, richiederebbero banconote cartacee che si svalutino su decisione del banchiere centrale, oppure, meglio che si svalutino secondo un algoritmo in maniera legata alla deflazione (se presente).


    Per quanto riguarda interventi di monetizzazione e spesa, credo invece li vedrò, ma non è una speranza, solo una previsione, pur sapendo quanto è facile sbagliarle. Credo possa esser in parte un'alternativa al qe e potrebbe generare una porzione di spesa pubblica diretta più dalla bc che dalla politica, contemporaneamente potrebbe calare la spesa pubblica gestita come di consueto dalla politica. Naturalmente dovranno esser contenute tutte quelle correnti pseudoeconomiche secondo le quali sarebbe necessario stampare per svalutare fortemente, per generare inflazione appositamente per fottere i bondisti, o per comprar voti.

    In ogni caso il sistema economico, monetario, cambia, cambierà, come cambiano le auto, difficile credere che tra 50 anni si sia ancora qui a fare sto qe e cose simili a quelle che vediamo ora

  8. #8
    L'avatar di signor pomata
    Data Registrazione
    Jun 2012
    Messaggi
    7,226
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Quoted
    2708 Post(s)
    Potenza rep
    0
    Citazione Originariamente Scritto da piof Visualizza Messaggio
    i tassi largamente negativi possono esser per ora solo un esercizio logico, non sono possibili, però se fossero possibili consentirebbero una gestione monetaria in un certo senso standard: l'economia va bene, la disoccupazione cala>tassi in rialzo; l'economia rallenta, la disoccupazione sale>taglio dei tassi, senza la preoccupazione di non poter andare sotto zero. La deflazione diverrebbe accettabile, niente più qe, niente più piani di acquisto di obbligazioni societarie, ma la convenzionale politica monetaria. Non credo li vedrò mai in vita mia, richiederebbero banconote cartacee che si svalutino su decisione del banchiere centrale, oppure, meglio che si svalutino secondo un algoritmo in maniera legata alla deflazione (se presente).


    Per quanto riguarda interventi di monetizzazione e spesa, credo invece li vedrò, ma non è una speranza, solo una previsione, pur sapendo quanto è facile sbagliarle. Credo possa esser in parte un'alternativa al qe e potrebbe generare una porzione di spesa pubblica diretta più dalla bc che dalla politica, contemporaneamente potrebbe calare la spesa pubblica gestita come di consueto dalla politica. Naturalmente dovranno esser contenute tutte quelle correnti pseudoeconomiche secondo le quali sarebbe necessario stampare per svalutare fortemente, per generare inflazione appositamente per fottere i bondisti, o per comprar voti.

    In ogni caso il sistema economico, monetario, cambia, cambierà, come cambiano le auto, difficile credere che tra 50 anni si sia ancora qui a fare sto qe e cose simili a quelle che vediamo ora
    Io ti dico la verità non ti capisco.
    Tempo fa scrivevi cose sensate, almeno con una certa logica.
    Ora, proprio no.
    Oppure non sei lo stesso.

Accedi